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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 89 (615 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 10, San Francisco 8, Bpa 4, Lee 3, Carmen Chu 2, Rachel 2, Catherine Dodd 1, Nancy Kirshner Rodriguez 1, Emily Conroy 1, Doug Chen 1, Bonnie 1, Christine 1, Nancy Goldberg 1, Newsom 1, Julie 1, United States 1, Richmond California 1, Arizona 1, Cisco 1, Richmond 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    January 18, 2013
    11:00 - 11:30pm PST  

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diesel and so on so i hope we can work together with that in the future. >> any questions? yes? het her bring the mike phone to you. >> why -- when you were talking about the cans and the bpa exposures, why did you just address beans? i'm assuming you mean any food or liquid in all cans? >> yes, it's all of them and i didn't mean to just address beans, that's why the recommendation is frozen or fresh vegetables, for instance, frozen and fresh fruits, we did a bunch of product testing and looked at also past product testing to see where are the highest levels of bpa in canned
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foods and it looks like they end up the most in kind of very complex foods like soup or, you know, the pasta dishes that i grew up in that came out of cans, those kinds of things that are salty and maybe also acidic and maybe also really fatty seemed to like suck the stuff up, so the highest levels were in those followed by i believe vegetables, my memory's a little rusty, especially if you're trying to pour your whole meal out of a can, that may be especially problem mat -- problematic, getting your things out of the soy boxes, or, you know, making a whole bunch of soup out of some fresh ingredients, freezing it in little glass containers, it's
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almost as easy as pulling a can out of the cupboard, do a big batch and you're going to know exactly what's in it, what was organic and what wasn't and you know it's not going to have bpa, but you're right, it's all canned food. >> and then my second question, i just wanted to clarify something or bring it to your attention, a lot of us here today work for the administration in this building which is actually is a pump station still in use that uses diesel pumps to pump the water from the ocean so it's not just a fire house, it's also us being exposed to diesel exhaust, and so with you mentioned this gal, rachel, is she the person who's not here today, or when you were talking about the air quality, having your air quality tested, and the odd thing is now a different agency runs and maintains these pumps that are
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right beneath us now so it gets kind of complicated, but i think i've been exposed, i worked at the airport for 11 years and then worked here, i have this exposure to diesel smell that you don't notice it here, i do notice it frequently, and so when you mention this gal rachel. >> so, just before this, we had a meeting because we're working on hopefully building a study to look at exposures among women in the fire course to understand what they're exposed to, this raises a really interesting kind of unique sub population within that, she is an environmental health scientist and has done a lot of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond
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california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is
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you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles, say for instance i have a case of like costco water in my trunk that i just keep, is it the heat that's leeching stuff into the water or is the sun breaking down the plastic, what is getting leaked into the water, is it the bpa or other toxins? >> these are great questions and they're kind of the same answer in a way. heat and light can both make plastic break down, either alone or in connection, i lived
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for a long time in arizona that if you leave your water in the car, it's cooking and getting exposed to light, but either one of those can lead chemicals to leak into the plastic, with bpa, we know, for instance, that it's hundreds of times more is leaked in with high heat than with low heat, it's just the nature of plastics. but the chemicals in most food contacts like that and your water bottles are usually a number 1, the main chemical in most of those is usually relatively safe in the scheme of things, but then different companies will put different additives to give that plastic the property they want and so a study that came out in 2010 found that some of those additives can act like
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estrogen, so with the heat or with the uv light in particular, but even at room temperature, some of those additives that are estrogenic can get into the water and cause for instance cells that are sensitive to estrogen to grow more quickly which many breast cancers are, so limiting use like in your car, get some stainless steel or aluminum water bottles, fill those with the water and you can leaf -- leave those in the car, you can have three or four so they're go and grab ready, plastics in the refrigerator, it's a personal decision, but sometimes i'll store stuff in plastic myself, but i kind of switched over to almost only glass just because it's easier to have one set of stuff ultimately. >> [inaudible]. >> obviously i'm not leaving it in there for months but i might
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leave a case in there, i might have that for a couple of weeks. >> studies they've done have usually been 72 to 108 hours, so relatively short-term, but also somewhat higher heat exposure than what we probably get most of the time in san francisco, so conditions are really variable and then it's usually controlled rather than kind of normal. yeah? >> so, in general where possible, staying away from plastic water bottles is not only making your life a little bit healthier, it's decreasing our dependence on plastic which is more important as a broader environmental issue, but even water bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a
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number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic
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bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing that keeps it from leak-proof or if i'm taking soup to work, i have my soup in a glass jar but i will throw it in plastic because i don't want it all over my backpack and there's also more stainless steel options which are a little more expensive but that's a one-time investment, just don't lose it, so a box of plastic bags, it lasts me like three year, parchment paper, it's the layer that touches your food and then aluminum foil isn't really bad,
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but parchment paper is a good thing. >> plastics in kids toys and kids products, they're not really labeled, i don't find the same symbol on them and i do a lot of the reuse and recycle, but mostly reusing things so we have hand-me-downs and all kinds of toys that have been through many generations and i sometimes think about it, i can only worry so much about what my son puts in his mouth, but when you talk about chemicals, where do you start, besides i know wooden toys are best and that was the plan originally, only wood in our house and glass and ceramics, that's all lovely in theory, it's not what happens unless you're a waldorf parent and you're strict and it's really your principle, so good will has a lot of plastic, so you
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know, anymore words on that, i realize it's a matter of what you can do, but -- >> i have not encountered some of those challenges because i'm not a parent but i have been around a lot of kids, important note is that in 2008, a law was passed that mra*s sites could not longer be used in kids toys , for right now, if you're buying new toys off the shelf, they're not going to have that particular compound, plus skish shi ones, they're not going to have that, i know you have a small child, is when they're at that mouthing stage of putting everything in their mouth, that maybe be the time to be most concerned about the specifics when they get to the older
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stage where, you know, there's some pretty nifty plastic toys out there, let's get real, and i like that i had legos as a kid and those were plastic, you know, maybe that's when you loosen it up a little bit and make, you know, judicious decisions, but when they're putting everything in their mouths, you want to be the most careful about what that is, parents may have other added tips. >> [inaudible] because most of the toys for kids, we don't really check sometimes where they're made. >> it's for toys sold in the united states, so regardless of where the manufacturer is, if they're sold in the u.s., they have to comply with those standards, other countries could well have different laws on their shelves and my guess would be vary from laws that would be more health protective
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to less fighters to join us. >> i have two questions, i'll keep them brief. we can't control where our fire houses are and our fire house is a block off the freeway, we do replace our h fact filters every five mother and is they're jet black when we replace them every three months, it is a big concern, how do we reduce our exposure when we're a block right off the freeway, we're bumper to bump traffic, and there are some fire houses that are literally underneath the freeway so how do we reduce that exposure, air filters, if so, what kind of air filters? >> you're getting beyond our technical knowledge of our filtration, but you know, it might be somebody to consult with somebody with expertise in air filtration for indoor air
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of course, maybe replacing those filters more often, you know, some very basic things and again, i'm not an engineer, but wiping down surfaces with moistures rather than a rag captures that better, otherwise you're containing it better, thinking about some of the basic things you do in the home, i would consult someone who has experience in air filters. >> [inaudible]. >> [inaudible] and my husband tells me they mop the apparatus floors every day because it's a diesel dust, i'm not sure if
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it's a common practice in fire houses, i was told someone in the fire department had developed cancer and they thought it was partly due to the diesel dust so they mop down every day, i know they probably sweep it but i don't know if mopping down is what 9 does, i don't know if this is company policy because i haven't been there. it is? okay. >> i have a question. my question is unrelated, talking about -- going back to the radiation and how bad it is for your body, so why do they recommend it as a treatment if someone has had cancer of various sorts? >> kind of because it can be toxic to cells and -- so, if you target it, right, and then you're directing it to those very cancer cells that are
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growing very rapidly and are in a very focal area, then you are, you know, -- and it's at a higher dose than you're exposed to when you're screening, you're killing those cells and you're stopping their growth, so they're leveraging that particular feature of the radiation just as they do with chemotherapy which is drugs that we won't have to take unless we're needing to kill those cancer cells. >> [inaudible] radiation? >> it is very focused >> even though the [inaudible] i was talking about, if it's focused, why does everybody leave the room? >> they're spending their 8 hour work day, and even if it's focused and there's a little bit of spread, radiation, as i understand, i'm not a physicist either, does reduce in its power the further away you get
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from it, right, that there's still, you know, if you're spending 8, 9 hours a day, you don't want that little bit added, they're getting better and better at in medical radiation when they're using it as a treatment, directing that ray to a more specific and localized area, but, you know, we do see in kids who are treated with radiation early -- for earlier childhood cancers that they can develop later life cancers as a result, now what's your trade-off there, the 20, 30 years of life they may have and maybe it's a treatable cancer they might get later, but if you're an adult and getting na, you're weighing the costs and benefits. >> i just wanted to say one thing about the -- a couple of things about the diesel fuel, christine brings a great thing
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about where your fire house is located but what are our practices in the fire house, and are your extractors plugged in when the rigs are on or they're plugged in and blowing into the apparatus floor and with some of our standing orders with the ambulances, i know for sure they're supposed to stay on all the time at a scene, you're at a house in an hour and your rig is supposed to be on outside, that's addressing some of those policies within our department, it's like, well, we're told you have to leave the rig running to keep the power up or something, well, come on now, you know, can't that not be changed a little bit, so i think that that is, you know, it's the diesel fuel we know is something cancer-causing, the other thing that came up with me is not a question but a comment with fire houses that i
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know and just starting to look and there's been some talk in our department, why do we have cell towers on our fire houses and there are some fire houses that have them and they're in places where it's exposing right where we sleep, why do -- why do we have that and is it a cost benefit thing, and just to start to ask some of those questions of our administration really, so that was it. >> so, i think that we are out of time, but this was wonderful, thank you for the rich questions and your attention and for bringing so many of you in here. >> i would like to thank bonnie and the breast cancer fund for coming and all of the local co-op that uses local ingredients, we practice what we preach.
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>> it's so great to see a full house like this. it means the world to us and to the whole cause of anti-trafficking. we are waiting for mayor lee. my name is nancy goldberg, cochair of the seven cisco collaborative against human trafficking.
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i wanted to introduce my past chair, and my new cochair. when i tell people of my involvement their shock to hear that san francisco is in major definition of human trafficking. they think it is people from other parts of the world. there are also so many right here, from our own bay area communities. in the city that is out of human trafficking we are also committed to being an agent of change. i want to give you a brief history of sf cat, san francisco collaborative against human trafficking. in response to what we saw is a growing problem, four organizations formed up in
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2008, the jewish coalition against human trafficking; national council of jewish women, jewish reel fund, -- we then realize would needed a wider coalition in order to be more effective we reached out to a large variety of the government sectors. in february 2008 the jewish coalition held a conference against human trafficking which included agencies such as the san francisco commission on the status of women, representative of the mayor's office and other nonprofits. this event also attracted
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members of the state assembly and a few congressional offices. at a meeting following our conference a i was asked to chair the larger group and my condition was that there be a cochair from the mayor's office at that time was catherine dodd. the san francisco collaborative against human traffic was born. in 2010 - from the beginning emily morassie (sounds like) executive director of the san francisco commission on the status of women was always involved as well as theresa sparks, executive director of the human rights commission. they were not only the core of the beginning but also generously offered to help us and support us and today that is where we are housed. we have a membership of over 28
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agencies public and private representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat
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annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you.
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why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of the fabulous poster contest. i am the executive director of commission on the status of women. the mayor will be announcing not only the winners of the poster contest but also the winners of this year's abolitionist awards. fire commissioner -- is here and emily conroy from the department of justice is here. thank you for joining us. i want to bring up mayor lee so she can bring up the announcements of the honorees for today.
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apl(applause) >> thank you emily and thank you to the commission on the status of women to our human rights commission thank you for being here and the commissioners and staff as well. thank you police chief for being here and certainly all the other department heads. wendy thank you for being here as well. members of the community. advocacy groups that have been so important to this movement. supervisor carmen chu, i know you and mayor newsom had this initial effort back some years ago to recognize the need to abolish human trafficking. an san francisco being such an international city, many of our roots are from immigrant families. we understand the problem.
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we did do something about it and continue that effort. i want to thank the us attorney's office for being here. and so many of you who have from the community done and continue to do what you can do to end human trafficking. this is such an important challenge for all of us. and because we here at from immigrant families; we hear from immigrant women and girls. the stories are real. they come across international borders. and so san francisco being the city that is not only aware of this, and aware of international traffic that occurs we have to continue doing something about it. if anything, our goal is of course to educate our youth; to make sure they understand that they have partners in both city government and in the community to help. those that are

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